Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies (University of North Carolina Press Paperback))

Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South Race Identity and the Making of a Nation First Peoples New Directions in Indigenous Studies University of North Carolina Press Paperback With than enrolled members North Carolina s Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River Malinda Maynor Lowery a Lumbee herself describes how between R

  • Title: Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies (University of North Carolina Press Paperback))
  • Author: Malinda Maynor Lowery
  • ISBN: 9780807871119
  • Page: 194
  • Format: Paperback
  • With than 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina s Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River Malinda Maynor Lowery, a Lumbee herself, describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s, the Lumbee crafted and maintained a distinct identity in an era defined by racial segregation in the South and paternalistic policies for InWith than 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina s Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River Malinda Maynor Lowery, a Lumbee herself, describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s, the Lumbee crafted and maintained a distinct identity in an era defined by racial segregation in the South and paternalistic policies for Indians throughout the nation They did so against the backdrop of some of the central issues in American history, including race, class, politics, and citizenship.9 Lowery argues that Indian is a dynamic identity that, for outsiders, sometimes hinged on the presence of Indian blood for federal New Deal policy makers and sometimes on the absence of black blood for southern white segregationists Lumbee people themselves have constructed their identity in layers that tie together kin and place, race and class, tribe and nation however, Indians have not always agreed on how to weave this fabric into a whole Using photographs, letters, genealogy, federal and state records, and first person family history, Lowery narrates this compelling conversation between insiders and outsiders, demonstrating how the Lumbee People challenged the boundaries of Indian, southern, and American identities.With than 50,000 enrolled members, North Carolina s Lumbee Indians are the largest Native American tribe east of the Mississippi River Malinda Maynor Lowery, a Lumbee herself, describes how, between Reconstruction and the 1950s, the Lumbee crafted and maintained a distinct identity in an era defined by racial segregation in the South and paternalistic policies for Indians throughout the nation They did so against the backdrop of some of the central issues in American history, including race, class, politics, and citizenship.

    • [PDF] Download ✓ Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies (University of North Carolina Press Paperback)) | by ☆ Malinda Maynor Lowery
      194 Malinda Maynor Lowery
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ✓ Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies (University of North Carolina Press Paperback)) | by ☆ Malinda Maynor Lowery
      Posted by:Malinda Maynor Lowery
      Published :2019-09-19T07:44:04+00:00

    356 Comment

    • Alessandra says:

      Outstanding read on indigenous identity-formation in the Jim Crow South. Lowery tackles with precision the factionalism apparent among her people, yet, unlike many other works, she embraces and expertly grapples with the intent and meaning behind political divisions both in and outside of the Lumbee community.

    • Marcela says:

      A great scholarly piece of work, written by an insider who relates her own family experiences into the larger questions of Native American community and identity. Growing up in Robeson County, it was sometimes hard to understand racial dynamics, and Maynor-Lowry's work does a lot to show how history played a part in why the schools were still segregated when we were going through them and why the Lumbees are still seeking federal recognition.

    • Adrian Jackson says:

      I bought this book for genealogical research. I found it to be informative and interesting. It covered a topic I knew scant about, and I can honestly say that it has improved by body of knowledge. Well done, Dr. Lowery!

    • Charles Stephen says:

      I found this book at the McKeldin Library at the University of Maryland. It had very few details that were helpful to my research.

    • Kimberly says:

      firstpeoplesnewdirections/

    • Eric says:

      Excellent, through and through.

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