The Anti-Communist Manifestos: Four Books That Shaped the Cold War

The Anti Communist Manifestos Four Books That Shaped the Cold War The subject of The Anti Communist Manifestos is four influential books that informed the great political struggle known as the Cold War Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler a Hungarian journali

  • Title: The Anti-Communist Manifestos: Four Books That Shaped the Cold War
  • Author: John V. Fleming
  • ISBN: 9780393069259
  • Page: 136
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The subject of The Anti Communist Manifestos is four influential books that informed the great political struggle known as the Cold War Darkness at Noon 1940 , by Arthur Koestler, a Hungarian journalist and polymath intellectual Out of the Night 1941 , by Jan Valtin, a German sailor and labor agitator I Chose Freedom 1946 , by Victor Kravchenko, a Soviet engineer anThe subject of The Anti Communist Manifestos is four influential books that informed the great political struggle known as the Cold War Darkness at Noon 1940 , by Arthur Koestler, a Hungarian journalist and polymath intellectual Out of the Night 1941 , by Jan Valtin, a German sailor and labor agitator I Chose Freedom 1946 , by Victor Kravchenko, a Soviet engineer and Witness 1952 , by Whittaker Chambers, an American journalist The authors were ex Communist Party members whose bitter disillusionment led them to turn on their former allegiance in literary fury Koestler was a rapist, Valtin a thug Kravchenko, though not a spy, was forced to live like one in America Chambers was a prophet without honor in his own land Three of the four had been underground espionage agents of the Comintern All contemplated suicide, and two of them achieved it John V Fleming s humane and ironic narrative of these grim lives reveals that words were the true driving force behind the Cold War.

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      Posted by:John V. Fleming
      Published :2019-06-05T16:27:25+00:00

    203 Comment

    • Jesse says:

      Fascinating stuff. I've read a ton in the literature of this period, and Fleming came up with all kinds of stuff I'd never heard of, including some major best-sellers from the late 30s/early 40s and some exposes I'd like to read as well. A medievalist by trade, Fleming here breaks form (he's retired, he notes in an afterword, and decided to follow his own urgings to his kids to try new things) and considers what he terms the most important ex-Communist exposes of the 40s and early 50s. Most peop [...]

    • Dennis D. says:

      I picked up this book after reading a strong review in the WSJ. I had a minor head-smack after starting, since the subject matter is four noteworthy anti-Communist books, none of which I had ever read (oops). But it grabbed me nonetheless, and this is a topic and an era that fascinates me.Author John V. Fleming points out that the war of propaganda was one of the major fronts in the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the West, and highlights here four books that are deemed to have had a major [...]

    • Daniel DeLappe says:

      This is a great book, but unless you are really into the subject, or you are one of the lefties he is writing about you would be wasting your time. I wish he had tied these three books into what is going on in the world today. Not much has changed. The world media a a joke and the most journalist are willfullly stupid or just affraid to see what is in front of them. If you do read this compare it to what goes on today (in particular think of the KGB rat that runs Russia and mentally challanged r [...]

    • Ny says:

      I never would have picked up this book if I hadn't worked on it, but so glad I did. Fleming is truly hilarious and the idea of researching 4 books' impact on the societies and political movements which they impacted is a great one. Can't wait to read his next book.

    • Jon says:

      A compelling look at four anti-Communist best-sellers from the Cold War era (one novel and three at least nominal memoirs): Arthur Koestler's DARKNESS AT NOON (the only one widely read today), Jan Valtin's OUT OF THE NIGHT, Victor Kravchenko's I CHOSE FREEDOM, and Whittaker Chambers' WITNESS. Fleming, a professor emeritus of literature at Princeton, has a tendency to engage in annoying tics such as the "not un-" formation (loathed by another anti-Communist, George Orwell, who once attacked it by [...]

    • Dan Walker says:

      Hard to imagine, but there was a time when communism was expected to sweep the globe. Many considered it man's last, best hope. This book explores the four books the author considers most crucial in stopping that momentum. All the writers were ex-Communists, including men who had been members of the German Communist Party who opposed the rise of Hitler, along with the first defector from the Soviet Union. One of the books was easily as popular as Gone with the Wind. Along the way you meet intere [...]

    • Diane says:

      This book has an intriguing premise: to study four books with an anti-Communist message that were published in the West after World War II. The author will then discuss how these books and their authors caused a seismic shift in American attitudes toward the Soviets. Unfortunately, the book is written at such a high level of detail that unless you are a specialist in the period and/or have read all the books that he discusses, you will likely be confused. I think if he had included a summary of [...]

    • Stephen says:

      Princeton medievalist who specializes in Franciscan literature writes book about Cold War era Result: an amazingly subtle interpretation of espionage books and ex-Communist memoirs in light of Dante, Shakespeare, and Walter von der Vogelweide.Presumes some pretty good knowledge of the Cold War era ahead of time, which I lacked. But the Whittaker Chambers chapter had me up till 4 a.m.Really provokes some serious questions about why these books -- all of them once best-sellers -- are rarely taught [...]

    • C. Varn says:

      I am not what you would normally say is a prime audience for this book, as a socialist, anti-marxism can be tedious, but the documentation of the war of ideas around anti-communist writings, mostly from Marxists or ex-Marxists, and their impact is a fascinating history in and of itself. Learning the literary of history and the sometimes profound effect that now obscure figures have had is vital despite ones economic leanings. This book is a good introduction into that world.

    • Jason says:

      I finished this book quite a while ago. It provides a well documents account of several great and dramatic, but now obscure, cold war dramas. The book gives the history of the creation and publication of the memoirs as well as the bare bones of the story that the memoir was based on. The book is well written and well paced.

    • Robert says:

      I can't recall when I've ever read a book this fascinating and revealing.

    • Natalie Keating says:

      I didn't read this entire book. I read two parts, one about Darkness at Noon and the other one about I Chose Freedom (the latter was what I acquired the book for because of a random interest in Soviet defectors). Overall it's an interesting book but is occasionally derailed by really random tangents. And I do get it, as the author is an academic and random tangents are near and dear to an academic's heart. But still, it was a bit much at times.As I said, the section on Viktor Kravchenko's autobi [...]

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