The Cool Factor: A Guide to Achieving Effortless Style, with Secrets from the Women Who Have It

The Cool Factor A Guide to Achieving Effortless Style with Secrets from the Women Who Have It Trendsetter Andrea Linett has that rare ability to distill fashion talk into advice that everyone can follow and in this book she shares the style wisdom she s gathered over years of working in the f

  • Title: The Cool Factor: A Guide to Achieving Effortless Style, with Secrets from the Women Who Have It
  • Author: Andrea Linett
  • ISBN: 9781579656485
  • Page: 219
  • Format: Paperback
  • Trendsetter Andrea Linett has that rare ability to distill fashion talk into advice that everyone can follow, and in this book she shares the style wisdom she s gathered over years of working in the fashion industry Here is only the content that matters wardrobe classics, leather, denim, suits, dressing in black and white, dressing up, getting the right fit, layering, accTrendsetter Andrea Linett has that rare ability to distill fashion talk into advice that everyone can follow, and in this book she shares the style wisdom she s gathered over years of working in the fashion industry Here is only the content that matters wardrobe classics, leather, denim, suits, dressing in black and white, dressing up, getting the right fit, layering, accessories, and hair Linett s fashion philosophy is illustrated through precise tips and photos of women who do it right, and from them we learn how to develop personal style Did you think a Canadian tuxedo denim on denim was an absolute faux pas Not if you pair the right shades of denim and dress it up with some serious heels Were you under the impression that your hair should get shorter with age That rule no longer exists Do you want to know how to wear black and white pieces together without looking like a cater waiter The black and white chapter is filled with some ingenious examples Finally, Linett rounds out the book with checklists, including must haves for a hardworking wardrobe, how to breathe new life into old pieces, how to make a trend your own, and how to make sure everything you buy actually fits.

    • [PDF] ê Free Read ☆ The Cool Factor: A Guide to Achieving Effortless Style, with Secrets from the Women Who Have It : by Andrea Linett Ä
      219 Andrea Linett
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      Published :2019-08-19T02:44:10+00:00

    508 Comment

    • Phyllis says:

      This is one of the most timeless books on style I've ever seen: everything is so classic and clean but not boring, and I loved the format with Linett photographing and interviewing her stylish friends. There's an emphasis on personal style that makes everything a lot more fun and accessible than the standard "how to dress to look young/not fat/rich" books that tend to pollute the genre. One thing I really, really loved about this book is that most of the women Linett profiles are over 30, which [...]

    • Tracy says:

      This book just confirms something that I've always known-I am NOT cool. I do not dress cool and I do not have effortless style. Oh well. Those who do need people like me to make them look even better than they already do. And I'm pretty sure that I am not going to wear black crew socks with high heels, even if someone tries to tell me that it is cool.

    • Jen says:

      Jen I couldn't finish this book. I'm okay with saying "I'm not cool enough" but I don't think that is the only issue. The whole first chapter is dedicated to blue jeans, including "The Canadian Suit" which is blue jeans paired with a blue jean shirt. This book felt like a big time warp to the Eighties. I flipped back to the publishing date just to verify it really was a new book. Not my style.

    • Stephanie says:

      Lots of denim, jumpsuits, neutrals, and the same old basics (white shirt, trench coat), livened up somewhat by interviews with the author's cool Brooklyn friends. The cool friends tend to say that they don't care about labels AT ALL, no they are not those people, but then will rattle off the names of their favorite niche designers or identify their favorite items of clothing by label. (Like the people in Architectural Digest who say, "oh, we are unpretentious folks who just like to play with the [...]

    • Terri Durling says:

      Most of these style books are the same but I can't seem to resist them so here I go again. This was one of the best and I thoroughly enjoyed the approach taken by Andrea Linett in writing this guide to achieving effortless style with secrets from women who have it. It had great photos and suggestions and all the women were fairly mature which in itself was positive. They all had great stye and showed it modelling their very own outfits and how they get their individual looks. Some I liked more t [...]

    • Deodand says:

      I took a quick run through the epub version of this book on my desktop. It's got some useful advice about layering and shoe types. I don't think it will age well, which is a problem shared in this genre. Also, the advice boils down to needing money, and lots of it, to buy the very best simple basics you can afford. Also you want to spend a lot of money on your hair. Oh, and you'll need to be skinny, too.

    • Andrea says:

      Meh. This was just okay, mostly because it didn't feel very original to me. Also, some of what she calls classics actually seem like pieces that are trending again right now (like jumpsuits, stripes, denim on denim, etc.). For example, Target's new line, Universal Threads, is following a lot of these cues.Perhaps it's that trends right now are moving more towards "classic" staples, or maybe she is actually a style influencer. I think it's more likely she's following trends herself. I've been wat [...]

    • Margaret Lozano says:

      Meh. As an older Millennial, this book perfectly describes the style I had in University. For some inexplicable reason, hipsters have made this 'cool'. I'm a bit dressier now (ok, a lot dressier - think somewhere between Claire from 'House of Cards' and hyper modern sci-fi style). This book is great for creative types and young people who are trying to figure out basic style. But if you have developed a more chic take on style, this is not for you.

    • Sukyong Suh says:

      Competently put together, goes down easy in an appealing way. Good enough for the kind of light reading I like to do while blow drying. Not particularly memorable nor inspiring. The obsession with jeans and leather jackets and white shirts and t shirts is not as universally useful as Linnet seems to think.

    • Lesa Parnham says:

      An impulsive waste of money.

    • Booklover says:

      Lots of great tips, but most usefulp. 209 Things that should fit smallAnkle boots -around the ankle so legs don't look heavyCardigans for layeringLong TanksSkinny JeansT-shirts

    • Anna Chenoweth says:

      This was disappointing. It should be called "Only Read This if you Have LOTS of Disposable Income for Clothes." Also, there was a definite lack of diversity in the women profiled.

    • Lily says:

      Pretty basic.

    • stephanie says:

      some of the advice was okay, but as much as i want to ~*~ up my wardrobe game ~*~ i am just going to live in leggings and cardigans forever because i do not understand fashion. and i would have liked to see representation of more body typesd WAY fewer references to "ethnic" jewelry.

    • JDAZDesigns says:

      I continue to check out books like this for the same reason one can't help but look at the aftermath of an accident on the expressway. There are as many authors who write about 'creating your personal style' as there are cars driving around LAAnd there are as many suckers who buy them!All hoping to find, as Andrea Linett touts on the cover, the secret to [insert adjective of your choice here].One can learn style - through trial and error and living and breathing and being - but, one cannot be ta [...]

    • Am Y says:

      The "effortless style" this book promotes is modern, contemporary, clean, and mostly for female white-collar professionals in their 20s-50s. It's mainly attire for the workplace. There's tons of denim (because the author is a fan), even denim on denim - which the author insists works (but I thought otherwise - ick), and lots of jumpsuits. The jumpsuits were terrible - none of them looked good, the author herself admitted that finding one that fits is a headache, and all the women who wore them i [...]

    • Jacqueline Bolier says:

      Common sense

    • Susannah says:

      This was a fairly average style guide. There are the usual tips for wardrobe basics, plus short interviews with some of the women Linett has asked to model in her book. My main problem with it is that everyone's style in it is exactly the same. The style role models that Linett has asked to feature in the book all share her own sense of style. I guess that is to be expected, since it is Linett's book, but it is not very inclusive if your own style does not fit her mold. Therefore, everyone wears [...]

    • Joanne says:

      Linett went to a sale at one of her favorite boutiques and noticed a bunch of "cool" women there, which she defines as women with their own style. So she arranged a photo shoot and asked them to come in with some clothes they love. Sounds promising, except that they all look pretty much the same to me-- despite different ages and ethnicities, they have similar body types and the same style. Boring.She promises that she will not tell you what pieces you absolutely must own and what you must not d [...]

    • Phyllis says:

      This was a fun, informative book - felt like I was reading a fashion magazine, with more details. The book had lots of color photos and advice about how to wear various styles and clothing items - using a variety of real people who range in age and "looks" - all from the fashion world. Included info on hats, jewelry, hair and makeup. What I liked best was the emphasis on finding your personal style and being comfortable with what you're wearing. This was a guilty pleasure for me, read under the [...]

    • Timothy White says:

      Not coolThe issue is I'm really not cool ! Some of the styles I did find cute . Most of them I found kind of ridiculous looking like you didn't know what to wear just through a bunch of things together . It may just be I'm just not cool ! Plus the fact that the photos are of people who are 30 or 40 pounds lighter than I am in the styles would not be attractive on me. I was hoping to see some cute outfits that I can put together but not so much .

    • Gina says:

      1/2/2017 - I grabbed this book at the library because 1) a friend mentioned it and 2) I liked The Lucky Guide to Mastering Any Style: How to Wear Iconic Looks and Make Them Your Own and I Want to be Her. Houston, we have a problem. The first chapter is title Why Denim Means Everything to Me. If I wrote a style book, my chapter would be title Why Denim Means Nothing to Me. I do not own a pair of jeans, and I do not see their value.

    • Marie says:

      Harumph. A strong focus on ephemeral trends, with not enough emphasis on timeless principles - at least for me. It will be weeded from library collections by chuckling librarians (o! look at those shoes! are you kidding me?!!) before 2020. But, it fits the needs of certain women at a certain time. On the other hand, if you're serious about classic style and you want a sustainable guide, go with Mary Lou Andre's Ready to Wear - from 2004. Still stands up to fashion critics.

    • Shannon says:

      What I liked about the book: the photos and the models. Most of them middle age women who mix vintage, bargains and expensive designer items. What I didn't like: there is little new here. Another style book rhapsodizing denim, white shirts, trench coats and blazers, layering jewelry, black pencil skirts and black heels. Recommended for the glimpse into how some very stylish women dress but wouldn't buy it as a "guide".

    • Marta Vieira says:

      Every now and again I pick up a glossy "style" book. They're generally a disappointment - so many rules, such ephemeral ideas, so few relevant things This was different, as I expected from Andrea Linett (used to love Lucky). It's about real women and their personal style, while simultaneously focused on fashion classics that will remain relevant in 20 years. The pictures were gorgeous and the entire book was enjoyable.

    • Shari Suarez says:

      Andrea Linett is the former creative director of Lucky Magazine which makes her uniquely equipped to write about style. She has chosen several prominent people in the fashion/entertainment business to provide their opinions as well. It is broken down into sections such as denim, leather and accessories. It was a quick and useful guide to fashion without throwing a lot of fashion rules at you.

    • Diane says:

      This was very much a hit and miss kind of book for me. Some of the women profiled look very hip, some just look (imo) ridiculous. My guess is if you work in design, art or fashion, this may resonate more with you. I liked the sections on hair and accessories but the actual sections on fashion in some cases, I thought were just awful. To each his own.

    • Asagao says:

      All the women have the same body type. I assume they all live in New York. All are employed in fashion or some creative endeavor. This book applies to a very small segment of the female population.

    • Carmen Brown says:

      Excellent fashion "reference" book. Also helps you think outside the box about how to pair different clothing items together. It also contains Top 20 must-haves and advice from fashionistas around the world.

    • Mikhaela says:

      Interesting ideas, but not my style for the most part, and too prescriptive about what is cool for everyone.

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