The Twelve Caesars

The Twelve Caesars The twelve Caesars of ancient Rome Julius Caesar Augustus Tiberius Caligula Claudius Nero Galba Otho Vitellius Vespasian Titus Domitian form a fabulous series The themes of countless legends

  • Title: The Twelve Caesars
  • Author: Michael Grant
  • ISBN: 9780760700884
  • Page: 147
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The twelve Caesars of ancient Rome Julius Caesar, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Titus Domitian form a fabulous series The themes of countless legends, these men were infamously depicted in Suetonius s Lives of the Caesars as strange at best hideously villainous at worst Delving into the personalities of theThe twelve Caesars of ancient Rome Julius Caesar, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Titus Domitian form a fabulous series The themes of countless legends, these men were infamously depicted in Suetonius s Lives of the Caesars as strange at best hideously villainous at worst Delving into the personalities of these rulers, classical historian Michael Grant attempts to sort fact from rumor to determine how each of these men used their unlimited authority Black white illustrations.

    The Twelve Caesars Suetonius Jun , Suetonius concisely relates all known facts and also some occurences that were not unanimously reported or unambiguously documented about the first twelve Caesars, starting with Julius Even when viewed by his contemporary AD set of moral, social, and judicial principles, the first dozen present less than admirable god like figures. The Twelve Caesars by Suetonius The Twelve Caesars chronicles the public careers and private lives of the men who wielded absolute power over Rome, from the foundation of the empire under Julius Caesar and Augustus, to the decline into depravity and civil war under Nero, and the recovery that came with his successors. The Twelve Caesars by Suetonius, Paperback Barnes Noble The Twelve Caesars Julius Caesar, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian created an empire which dominated the then known world and influenced it for a millennium. The Twelve Caesars by Michael Grant The Twelve Caesars The twelve Caesars of ancient Rome Julius Caesar, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Titus Domitian form a fabulous series The themes of countless legends, these men were infamously depicted in Suetonius s Lives of the Caesars as strange at best hideously villainous at worst. The Twelve Caesars Summary Study Guide BookRags The Twelve Caesars is probably the most in depth book ever written about the personal lives of the twelve caesars Suetonius goes to great lengths to reveal the way these men really were, as human beings Each emperor is dissected, and his actions beyond politics and professionalism revealed.

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    109 Comment

    • Tony says:

      THE TWELVE CAESARS. (1975). Michael Grant. ****.This work by Grant starts off with the book of the same name by Suetonius and takes off from there. This is kind of a post-doc read on the Caesars. Grant has scoured the extant literature from the classical period and gathered together additional information about each of the subjects. His intent was to provide information that would help us understand the motivations behind each of these rulers and the men who help carry them out. Much of the info [...]

    • Ruthiella says:

      I read this in tandem with Suetonius’ Lives of the Caesars. This book uses Suetonius as its primary source but expands the biographies by using other sources and places each Caesar in his historical and sociological context. Also, it tries to separate out (or at least re-consider) some of the hearsay recorded by Suetonius. I think the big take away here was that having absolute power over the known world was an exhausting job and only few (Augustus, Claudius, Vespian) did it well.

    • Chris says:

      Not as scandelous as a certain BBC production but interesting none the less.

    • Alexander says:

      Clearly aimed at famous Suetonius’s work by the same title, Grant’s book supplements the former account with many more sources (from Tacitus and Dio Cassius to modern researchers in Roman History and new findings). Even more important, mere narration of the events is combined with an attempt to analyze and explain them. Even for those familiar with the subject, there are many discoveries to be made. The Author does a great job demonstrating just what a tremendously back breaking duty the “ [...]

    • Al says:

      This was a very light read, which is not necessarily a bad thing. Grant includes a lot of information on how these first rulers impacted the political development of the early principate, and their effect on their immediate surroundings, the city of Rome. Grant makes an interesting point about the crushing work load that the position entailed, and it was fascinating to look at these men through that lens. He critically uses multiple classical sources: Suetonius, Tacitus, Livy, Philo, Virgil, Sen [...]

    • jon says:

      Grant's work is like an expanded companion to reading Suetonius, a complement of additional readings and input from other contemporary or relevant ancient voices on the Caesars (suitably footnoted for reference), and woven into an informative and insightful narrative of their lives. Imagine reading Suetonius in the study of the Caesars with an eminent classicist beside you to add questions, comments, and apprise you as go. I picture this work rising out of Grant's research and lectures. An inval [...]

    • Tori says:

      While it was an interesting look at 12 of the Caesars, I couldn't help but feel it somewhat partial as to only how Rome saw them. For example, when Titus was described, he was told to rule with mildness, while earlier in his chapter we are told of his horrific persecution of the Jews by the thousands. I was also somewhat disappointed that I didn't learn much about Rome itself during these time periods, which is unfortunate as I think it would have helped me get a better picture of these men.

    • Susan says:

      6/14/2011: (REVISED)True, this isn't the worst book ever. It does have its interesting moments but considering the other recent nonfiction books I've discovered, I think I have to lower my ratings on this book. It IS boring in several parts. I never chose to voluntarily read it, and I never actually finished this book despite that this was assigned as my summer reading book. Only people who LOVE the Roman empire and the twelve caesars would enjoy every page of this book.

    • Deborah says:

      Not very good. The author gives a very brief rundown of each of the caesar's lives. In doing so, he many times jumps in time. In the rush through his subjects, he misses much of the details that give a complete picture of these men. Unless you are already familiar with his subjects, you will be lost. Youwill be much better off reading other books onthis subject.

    • Hannah says:

      Grant's coverage makes for an interesting read for those interested in the Roman emperors and looking for general overviews rather than anything in-depth. He has a simple style that makes reading this easy rather than a headache, and as such, I'd recommend this to non-experts. People looking for scholarly sources, however, would probably find Grant's book of little use.

    • James says:

      For those of us who are fascinated with ancient Rome, You cant go too far wrong with Michael GrantConsidering the time elapsed and te paucity of information it is an excellent and entertaining read. One you can return to again and again

    • Jonathan says:

      A very informative take on Suetonius's book about the first twelve emperors of Rome. Very interesting and humanizing.

    • Monica Perez says:

      Overviews of their personalities rather than the events of their reigns. good supplement to the more chronological narratives of roman history.

    • Larry Van Bibber says:

      Interesting but just an overview

    • Roy says:

      Nice introductory book for anyone who is interested in learning the history of Julius Caesar and those that followed straight after .

    • Julie says:

      I was inspired to read this by the Rome TV series to be able to better tell fact from fiction.

    • Shana Yates says:

      Well-written and well-researched brief account of the twelve men who took the name Caesar.

    • Varun Godbole says:

      A good overview of their lives, personalities and how they rose to power.

    • sologdin says:

      serious historian de-gossipifies the obvious primary source text for this interpretation. fairly straightforward & reliable.

    • booklady says:

      Read this many years ago. My current reading of Taylor Caldwell's book on St. Luke set during this timeframe has me interested in rereading at least portions of this.

    • Ginger Heskett says:

      I registered a book at BookCrossing!BookCrossing/journal/14341390

    • Robert Ingram says:

      A wonderful gift from a wonderful friend, John Windsor. I highly recommend this as a good read.

    • Will Leamon says:

      This was my second book by Grant and he's really good, I only docked a star because he sometimes comes across a bit flip.

    • Leelan says:

      Good book. But it only gives thumbnail sketches of the Caesar's lives. I wish it gave more.

    • Roger says:

      In general, Michael Grant is awesome. Just read him if you're interested in Ancient Rome.

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