The David Foster Wallace Reader

The David Foster Wallace Reader The David Foster Wallace Reader is a selection of David Foster Wallace s work introducing readers to his humour kindness sweeping intellect and versatility as a writer A compilation from the one of

  • Title: The David Foster Wallace Reader
  • Author: David Foster Wallace
  • ISBN: 9780316182393
  • Page: 389
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The David Foster Wallace Reader is a selection of David Foster Wallace s work, introducing readers to his humour, kindness, sweeping intellect and versatility as a writer.A compilation from the one of the most original writers of our age, featuring the very best of his fiction and non fiction previously unpublished writing and original contributions from 12 prominentThe David Foster Wallace Reader is a selection of David Foster Wallace s work, introducing readers to his humour, kindness, sweeping intellect and versatility as a writer.A compilation from the one of the most original writers of our age, featuring the very best of his fiction and non fiction previously unpublished writing and original contributions from 12 prominent authors and critics about his workFrom classic short fiction to genre defining reportage, this book is a must for new readers and confirmed David Foster Wallace fans alike One of the most dazzling luminaries of contemporary American fiction Sunday Times There are times, reading his work, when you get halfway through a sentence and gasp involuntarily, and for a second you feel lucky that there was, at least for a time, someone who could make sense like no other of what it is to be a human in our era Daily Telegraph A prose magician, Mr Wallace was capable of writing .about subjects from tennis to politics to lobsters, from the horrors of drug withdrawal to the small terrors of life aboard a luxury cruise ship, with humour and fervour and verve Michiko Kakutani, The New York TimesDavid Foster Wallace wrote the novels The Pale King, Infinite Jest, and The Broom of the System and three story collections His nonfiction includes Consider the Lobster and A Supposedly Fun Thing I ll Never Do Again He died in 2008.

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    793 Comment

    • KarmA1966 says:

      I'm not a Daniel Foster Wallace fanboy. Save for a few short stories I ran across in literary anthologies years ago, I'd never read anything by him; neither am I one of his savage critics, constantly railing against his excesses. I entered The David Foster Wallace Reader as a blank slate and, The Reader, like most of Wallace's works, is a daunting doorstopper of a book, clocking in at nearly 1,100 pages when including the footnotes (and if you read Wallace, you can't leave off the footnotes).Muc [...]

    • John says:

      Five stars coz this book, contains his teaching materials. The secret of the genius.

    • Sharon says:

      Re-reading these shorts stories and excepts from DFW's books reminds me of what a unique voice he had and how much I enjoyed reading his work. Of course it also makes me sad that he is dead. The notes from his teaching days were incredibly interesting and showed how strict he was as a professor.

    • Natalie says:

      Here's a conversation I had with my good book buddy, RAC:RAC: "I'm not saying Harold is gospel. He detests one of my favorite writers, but his is an interesting opinion on DFW, worth something or nothing: wwd/eye/people/the-full-bl" so I go and read that, and excerpt some of it below, and respond:ND: A few thoughts that came up while reading The DFW Reader, with reflection on your linked article:"Whitman, he notes, “reinvented poetry, not so much the outer form, which doesn’t count for much [...]

    • April Sanders says:

      The David Foster Wallace Reader is a distillation of the author's best fiction and nonfiction. It is,simply, the finest writing I have ever encountered in a lifetime of reading. I have included a few of my favourite excerpts here. (These are a small sample.of his brilliance). Incarnations of a Burned Child is not included but is you are interested, look it up. It is a masterpiece. I have included 2 examples from his fiction.The first from his piece, The Suffering Channel where journalist Skip At [...]

    • Mark Schlatter says:

      I tried reading Infinite Jest about a decade ago and stopped when I got to a passage written out in heavy dialect. I read very quickly, and anything that slows me down tends to put me off the book. (I’m looking at you, text pages in comic books!) By my recollection, the book was interesting but not worth my effort at the time.I picked up the Reader after watching The End of the Tour with a special interest in the non-fiction piece “A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again”, Wallace’s [...]

    • MichaelRowe says:

      The fact that the "Reader" will leave you wanting more is a testament to both the collected works and Wallace's talent as a writer. It's fantastic.

    • Fantasymundo says:

      En definitiva, ‘Portátil’ (Literatura Random House, 2016) resulta ser un limitado volumen de entrada a la obra de David Foster Wallace. Ilustrativo de su camino como autor, pero muy lejos de representarlo en toda su complejidad. Hasta el punto de resultar Seguir leyendo

    • Joey Barron says:

      According to the publisher and contributors, the purpose of this collection is to “delight readers” and provide teachers “an ideal introduction for students.” The criteria for selections were most celebrated, most enjoyable, funniest, and most remarkable. The only new selections I hadn’t read prior were “The Planet Trillaphon as It Stands in Relation to the Bad Thing” (1984), Teaching Materials (with a beautiful introduction by David’s mother, Sally), as well selected Afterwards [...]

    • Jeff says:

      The whole idea of a " Reader " is a bit foreign to me but, that said, I do understand the merit in a circumstance such as one encounters with DFW. His work is so well spoken of, or, at least, very spoken of, that it can seem a bit overwhelming knowing where to jump in. Looming over the horizon is always the monstrous " Infinite Jest." It's my thought that the latter is this generations " Ulysses ", that is a book on many more shelves as unread than read. I'm not criticizing, it has sat in my que [...]

    • David says:

      The book whose title describes you as you read it.There was very little here I haven't read before, and even the big one I hadn't (Planet Trillaphon) I'd possessed (like many other DFW obsessives) for years. I just never wanted to read through that last little bit, you know? Now it's all been read.But not used up. That's the good part. So much of his work rewards multiple readings. Oblivion yields up new treasures every time through, as does, of course, the monster Infinite Jest.The various intr [...]

    • Peter Knox says:

      A truly fantastic and representative overview of DFW and his lasting legacy for newcomers and long-time fans. The real gem is the previously unpublished short story on depression (written in college; The Planet Trillaphon), which gets top billing and lead placement in the collection. Simply put: it's perhaps the best writing on depression and what it is to be depressed as I've read anywhere (and I'm not exactly a depressive myself). Then there's selections from all of his published books and som [...]

    • Michael Friedman says:

      David Foster Wallace was a brilliant writer. His command of English is as good as it gets and this tome (48 hours and 45 minutes in Audible) is often difficult but in the end rewarding. The fiction is particularly strange and the theme of characters who are deeply psychologically flawed is both ironic and at times tedious. He is a great fan of irony, the ultimate being his struggles with psychiatric issues that plagued and ultimately ended his life. That being said, it is mentioned that at some [...]

    • Kevin Krein says:

      well, i did it. i finally finished this epic tome. i split it up between sections, taking a break to read something else every once in a while, which is why it took me from november until april to do this. the reason i couldn't give this five stars is because as a "reader," it's a little subjective to the people that selected which pieces are included. it's like- maybe i would have chose different things from "Infinite Jest" or different selections from "The Pale King," you know? but overall, it [...]

    • Ethan says:

      This book only contains samples from multiple works and collections of David Foster Wallace's novels, short stories and non-fiction essays. There is only one short story in this by David Foster Wallace that you won't find in his other books, but there are several afterwords by different people and teaching materials by Sally Wallace. I personally wouldn't read his work in this form. This seems like it would be a great book for teaching a class about his work. That being said, it is still David F [...]

    • Gina says:

      I was actually pleasantly surprised by how well the novel excerpts came together given how they are, after all, snippets of a broader cohesive work. But then a lot of times you get the sense that you could drop in at any point in a David Foster Wallace work and know what's happening. There's a sort of pleasant wandering that almost approaches recursiveness, like going around a park that has many paths and not backtracking on any path but ending up at the same starting/ending point. Maybe this is [...]

    • Jerome says:

      Picked it up so i could read the super depressing,"The Planet Trillaphon as it Stands in Relation to the Bad Thing",the afterwards & the part in this collection that his mother wrotei have already read everything else DFW published except Everything and More & McCain's Promise& but so,the selections they chose for "The David Foster Wallace Reader" are great pieces of writing.One more thing: "The Planet Trillaphon as it Stands in Relation to the Bad Thing" is about as depressing as th [...]

    • Darcysmom says:

      The David Foster Wallace Reader was the best introduction to DFW that I could imagine. The reader gets a taste of his fiction and non fiction in a nicely curated volume. I was surprised how much I liked the email correspondence with his mother and the syllabi for courses he taught. I was equally surprised that the excerpt from The Infinite Jest didn't excite me as much as I had expected it to.This is a book worth reading.

    • Jon says:

      Really bought this just for the Chapters from "The Pale King", though I found his correspondence with his mother, students, and faculty most interesting -- and useful. Along with his class schedule and syllabi. Though I must say, the first Chapter of TPK is perhaps the best thing I have ever read.

    • Sharon says:

      Such a delight. I loved reading new things of his I'd never read, and re-reading - the Infinite Jest excerpts included some of my favorite parts. And his teaching materials are gold, especially his email discussions with his mother over fine points of grammar.

    • Josh Skinner says:

      Wallace's use of language is brilliant. There is no other way to put it. I enjoy his non-fiction immensely. I get lost in his fiction at times. Still a pleasure though. I will return to this reader again.

    • Paul says:

      Wonderful wonderful excerpts from Wallace's writing: both short stories, essays and novels. Must read Infinite Jest at some stage.

    • Sean O'Brien says:

      Wonderful. Topical references in non-fiction but always insightful.

    • Kent says:

      Read might not be the right word. I listened to many segments of this audio presentation which features several readers spanning many works. In a weird way I enjoy listening to things I have already read before better than the new stuff, so I will turn back to this and listen to Wallace’s pieces after I’ve read them. I’m putting it away for a while though, so I’ll give it the deserving 5 stars and move on.

    • Yeni López says:

      Todo lo que puedo decir de este libro lo apunté aquí: cuadrivio/breve-visita-alPero para resumirlo: propuesta editorial interesante pero fallida. Los ensayos sobre Foster Wallace, irregulares. Los poemas de Calamaro, HORRIBLES. El material lectivo de Wallace, curioso pero no entendí qué hace ahí.

    • Peter says:

      I received this book for free through First Reads. Those of us who love David Foster Wallace's work think there are two types of people: those who love his writings and those who have not yet read any of his work. The David Foster Wallce Reader is a gift to both audiences (for those who have read his work and think they dislike it, there are enough surprises for them to reevaluate their opinion. The David Foster Wallace Reader, like any anthology, is not intended to be read straight through. In [...]

    • Michael says:

      David Foster Wallace must have been one strange and wonderful cat. I don't know for sure since I did not know him or even follow his career and personal life till only recently, but my impression of him through his writing and interviews tell me I'm right. He was a writer who shared much of his personal life experience in essays yet he was an introvert (or perhaps rather, not an extrovert) at heart, literally sweating at times over how he would come across during speeches and interviews. As a pr [...]

    • Ron says:

      This is not my review. This is an intention to write one when I finish Wallace's David Foster Wallace Reader. Author Readers are some of the best parts of an author's writing but you inevitablity find some of his worse writing thrown in by an editor or a contributor who completely misses the point of an article or essay. Wallace was a new breed of writer (a post post modernist) who was still trying to find what he really wanted to write. He did not get there but he wrote some of the smoothist no [...]

    • DeadWeight says:

      The decisions to not include Brief Interviews With Hideous Men in its entirety (much like an album, the stories on Brief Interviews coalesce into a beautiful collage, and to include only some of them takes away from this) and omit Wallace's masterfully epic political essay, "Up, Simba," are serious slights against this Reader's claims¹ to be the consummate source of Wallace's writings. What you can get here that you can't get elsewhere - and what will absolutely only appeal to the diehard DFW f [...]

    • Nick says:

      “a kiss with you is, if I may indulge a bit for a moment here, not so much a kiss as it is a dislocation, a removal and rude transportation of essence from self to lip, so that it is not so much two human bodies coming together and doing the usual things with their lips as it is two sets of lips spawned together and joined in kind from the beginning of post-Scarsdale time, achieving full ontological status only in subsequent union and trailing behind and below them, as they join and become who [...]

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