TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 2: Patrick Troughton

TARDIS Eruditorum A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume Patrick Troughton This second volume of collected and expanded posts from the popular blog TARDIS Eruditorum offers a critical history of the Patrick Troughton era of Doctor Who Steadily tracking the developing story o

  • Title: TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 2: Patrick Troughton
  • Author: Philip Sandifer
  • ISBN: 9781479389063
  • Page: 244
  • Format: Paperback
  • This second volume of collected and expanded posts from the popular blog TARDIS Eruditorum offers a critical history of the Patrick Troughton era of Doctor Who Steadily tracking the developing story of Doctor Who from its beginning to the present day, TARDIS Eruditorum pushes beyond received fan wisdom and dogma to understand the story of Doctor Who as the story of an entThis second volume of collected and expanded posts from the popular blog TARDIS Eruditorum offers a critical history of the Patrick Troughton era of Doctor Who Steadily tracking the developing story of Doctor Who from its beginning to the present day, TARDIS Eruditorum pushes beyond received fan wisdom and dogma to understand the story of Doctor Who as the story of an entire line of mystical, avant garde, and radical culture in Great Britain a show that is genuinely about everything that has ever happened, and everything that ever will This volume focuses on Doctor Who s intersection with psychedelic Britain and with the radical leftist counterculture of the late 1960s, exploring its connections with James Bond, social realism, dropping acid, and overthrowing the government Along, of course, with scads of monsters, the introduction of UNIT, and the Land of Fiction itself Every essay on the Troughton era has been revised and expanded, along with eight brand new essays written exclusively for this collected edition, including a thorough look at UNIT dating, an exploration of just what was lost in the wiping of the missing episodes, and a look at Stephen Baxter s The Wheel of Ice On top of that, you ll discover Whether The Mind Robber implies an alternate origin for the Doctor in which he is not a Time Lord but a lord of something else entirely How The Evil of the Daleks reveals the secrets of alchemy What can be seen on a walking tour of London s alien invasions.

    • Free Read [Crime Book] ✓ TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 2: Patrick Troughton - by Philip Sandifer ✓
      244 Philip Sandifer
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Crime Book] ✓ TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 2: Patrick Troughton - by Philip Sandifer ✓
      Posted by:Philip Sandifer
      Published :2019-09-10T22:44:22+00:00

    521 Comment

    • F.R. says:

      Once again, instead of just dipping into his website, reading Philip Sandifer’s take on every ‘Doctor Who’ episode in the order the stories were made and the essays were written, really bears rewards. We get a clearer sense of the programme developing, of a show occasionally losing its footing but gaining again, of one finding new directions to take. We see a show that learns from its mistakes, although also one that repeats certain mistakes again and again.Some will no doubt be surprised [...]

    • Daniel Kukwa says:

      The 2nd Doctor is usually the one I've been least engaged bybut Philip Sandifer's elegiac examination of his era -- and its reflection of a crumbling 1960s optimism -- makes for one of the best of an already fantastic series of critiques. I just can't get enough of these booksd my unquenchable desire to consume these critiques and reviews have come a long way from the old John Peel "Files Magazines" I first discovered 30 years ago.

    • Sammy says:

      Like the first volume, Sandifer's second instalment of the "TARDIS Eruditorum" is a worthy addition to the canon. He praises the wonderful works of The Discontinuity Guide, Running Through Corridors, Volume 1: The 60s: Rob and Toby's Marathon Watch of Doctor Who, and About Time 1: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who as his icons, and Sandifer has definitely contributed in that vein.The author's viewpoint, however, is a more academic one, looking to offer redemptive readings of all episodes of t [...]

    • Eero says:

      68% completed:When I started reading this book I had not seen any of the Troughton episodes or read any of the Doctor Who novelizations. I liked the writing, although at the same time I felt it was directed to a different audience to which I did not really belong. This book consists of essays (originating as blog postings) that discuss each of the serials, placing them in the context of the times with mentions of music charts and news items from the times they aired. For the uninitiated, the dis [...]

    • Jamie Revell says:

      The second volume of Philip Sandifer's critical history of Doctor Who continues in much the same vein as the first one. There are, once again, issues with the formatting, although somewhat less so than in the first volume, and there's nothing obviously missing this time. The signs of the essays having been edited for the book (they originally appear on the web) are also clearer here, perhaps indicating a self-publisher improving with practice. The book also includes the essay on 'The Massacre' m [...]

    • Nicholas Whyte says:

      nwhytevejournal/2063515ml[return][return]I occasionally go and dip into Phil Sandifer's excellent blog, but have not read as much of it as I would like to. I find the individual essays fascinating, but in the whole just a little too long for my preferred reading time; and more worryingly, they tend to leave me simultaneously wanting to read more and wishing there was better internal navigation to the blog than simply following Sandifer's stream of consciousness (even though that is largely align [...]

    • Stephen Hartwell says:

      A fantastic literary piece on the history of Doctor Who as it happened, this time focused on the Patrick Troughton years from 1966 - 1969. The author is full of insightful comments about the development of the series, the Doctor and the stories, and has definitely placed the story of Doctor Who into the history of the late 1960s by discussing psychedelia, the summer of love and space exploration. Although his opinions may not be to one's individual taste, it is refreshing to see someone share th [...]

    • Krista McCracken says:

      A literary and historical look at Doctor Who focused on the Patrick Troughton years from 1966 - 1969. The book contextualized the Troughton years, discusses historical events of the 1960s, and analyzes each second Doctor story in turn. I generally enjoyed this though there were a couple of essays that were slog worthy and that I struggled to read to their conclusion. The book is a very academic look at Doctor Who and there are definitely conclusions drawn by Sandifer that go against established [...]

    • Joanne Mullen says:

      Although a firm fan favourite, Patrick Troughton's tenure risks being forgotten as many of his stories were destroyed by the BBC - in acts of wanton cultural vandalism which blighted many other shows - to reclaim videotapes or save shelf space.Sandifer's book manages to bring these often lost stories to life once more, mixing behind the scenes anecdotes with a broad sweep across the social and political mores of the time. Whether or not you've seen any Troughton stories this book is a must read [...]

    • Mike Romard says:

      This may not have been the best volume for me to start with, since I've only seen a couple of serials from the Troughton era (and a few stray episodes and scenes that are available on the Lost in Time DVDs). Still, it was interesting to read about Doctor Who in the context of the culture that it was made in, especially since the mid- to late-60s are, to me at least, a fascinating time period.

    • Christopher says:

      Why this book doesn't rate higher:"At the end of the day""If we're being honest""Frankly"Sandifer abuses these and many other phrases to the point of maddening distraction. He had a PHD in English lit? I find that hard to believe given his amateurish writing style.

    • Sean Williams says:

      I'm a fan of the blog and I have read many of the chapters there already. The expanded version is even more interesting. Fantastic cover, too: I bought the paperback as well as the e-book so I could admire it properly.

    • Mike Beasley says:

      Like the first volume, this was an engaging and thought-provoking work. Sandifer's writing is more confident here than in the first volume.

    • James Gent says:

      A fascinating cultural exploration of the Trougton years of Dr Who. Often illuminating, always interesting.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *