The Hall of Nearly Great

The Hall of Nearly Great The Hall of Nearly Great is an ebook meant to celebrate the careers of those who are not celebrated It s not a book meant to reopen arguments about who does and does not deserve Hall of Fame enshrinem

  • Title: The Hall of Nearly Great
  • Author: Sky Kalkman Marc Normandin
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 154
  • Format: ebook
  • The Hall of Nearly Great is an ebook meant to celebrate the careers of those who are not celebrated It s not a book meant to reopen arguments about who does and does not deserve Hall of Fame enshrinement Rather, it remembers those who, failing entrance into Cooperstown, may unfairly be lost to history It s for the players we grew up rooting for, the ones whose best yearThe Hall of Nearly Great is an ebook meant to celebrate the careers of those who are not celebrated It s not a book meant to reopen arguments about who does and does not deserve Hall of Fame enshrinement Rather, it remembers those who, failing entrance into Cooperstown, may unfairly be lost to history It s for the players we grew up rooting for, the ones whose best years led to flags and memories that will fly together forever Players like David Cone, Will Clark, Dwight Evans, Norm Cash, Kenny Lofton, Brad Radke, and many others.This is not a numbers driven project although our contributors lean analytical in their views Our plan isn t to be overbearing with stats and spreadsheets to convince you that these players are worth remembering What we aim to do, instead, is accomplish that same task through stories Think of your favorite players growing up they have their moments, games, seasons, quirks, personalities, and legends worth remembering and sharing Now, combine the best of everyone s forgotten favorites, and you ve got a Hall of Nearly Great Ask the people who have those memories and love for these players to write essays about them, and you have The Hall of Nearly Great ebook.It takes a talented writer to give these players their due honors, and we ve collected forty two talented writers to do just that These are All Star writers, some of our favorite must reads in today s expansive baseball coverage landscape They have diverse voices, diverse backgrounds and diverse interests, but they all love baseball and have a passion for the players they re writing about You already love some of these players, and you ll come to love the rest.

    • Unlimited [Religion Book] ☆ The Hall of Nearly Great - by Sky Kalkman Marc Normandin ✓
      154 Sky Kalkman Marc Normandin
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Religion Book] ☆ The Hall of Nearly Great - by Sky Kalkman Marc Normandin ✓
      Posted by:Sky Kalkman Marc Normandin
      Published :2019-05-04T09:41:03+00:00

    826 Comment

    • Mike says:

      A fantastic idea well-executed, The Hall of Nearly Great endured a name change and a Kickstarter campaign before coming to the world of e-readers, and the result charmed me thoroughly. The book is comprised of several dozen essays of varying length dedicated to memorializing major league baseball players whose careers fell short of Hall of Fame recognition. Some were derailed by injury, others unfairly overlooked due to the era in which they played or their lack of a definitive performance peak. [...]

    • Tara says:

      A collection should be judged by two main variables: the strength of its theme, and the strength of its contributors. Unfortunately, this book doesn't particularly score high in either. Giving a blow-by-blow account of very good, if largely forgettable baseball players sounds tedious just as an idea, but in practice becomes even more tedious in the hands of the uneven talent level the book editors gathered. Some tales were actually good, and some were genuinely awful, but even some of the bigger [...]

    • Oliver Bateman says:

      Each essay in here is likely to be the best essay you'll read about a given "Hall of Nearly Great" player. Posnanski on Dale Murphy is perhaps the definitive work the collection (and I'm saying that grudgingly, since I'm not a big fan of America's most notorious Paterno defender), but the essays on Will Clark, Ellis Burks, and Darrell Porter are also very good. Notwithstanding my remarks about the "best essay you'll read about a given player," the quality in tHoNG IS uneven (after all, who is li [...]

    • Joel says:

      A fun collection of essays about baseball players that deserve to be remembered more than they are. Obviously, the quality is going to vary in a collection like this, but for the most part the pieces are amusing and enlightening, painting interesting pictures of some players I barely knew anything about. I'd argue for the inclusions of Doc Gooden and Darryl Strawberry, but I KNOW THAT'S TWO METS, and there are literally dozens of players who would have made great additions. The best pieces are t [...]

    • Nathan Krueger says:

      A collection of well written essays be some of the great new-wave baseballs writers currently in the biz. The book focuses on those players who will (likely) never make the hall of fame. Each essay is penned by a different author, and has its own take on the subject matter. In many cases it reminded me of players I watched throughout their careers, and in others introduce facts about players I only know by name. I will certainly re-read this down the road, and hope for a similar installment from [...]

    • Jonathan Blanks says:

      This is a great collection for baseball stat heads that have maintained their romanticism for the game. If you lack either one of those qualities, this is probably going to disappoint you. However, this collection is perfect for people who have embraced advanced stats but still maintain their love for solid players that didn't quite capture the larger public imagination or whose greatness was too fleeting for Cooperstown.

    • B says:

      Book of Nearly GreatSome of the essays are super-exciting. Others a little less so. I think the authors actually underestimated how interesting the stories were and sometimes got a little too literary and brief to jazz it up. A couple of distracting errors (missing words, double quotations) in my version that I'm sure will clear up.Also, I very much wish that the essays went in some sort of order and included fewer Red Sox.

    • Meril says:

      Review to come, mostly about the ephemeral nature of Internet sportswriting. Also this is the 33 1/3 series of sportswriting anthologies: the ones that use the album as a springboard to further things can be great, but occasionally there's a mess. There is indeed a mess in here and if you know your internets sports guys, you can take a guess which one it is and probably be correct.

    • Brian Ashmore says:

      Enjoyable romp through some players that seemed like legends in the making for a short time, only to fall a little short. Did that diminish how much we loved them, nope. Great read for any baseball fan.

    • Patrick Coffey says:

      A great book about some of the great players who are on the outside looking in to the Hall of Fame. It is interesting to imagine how some of these players would have had different careers if circumstances had been different.

    • Zayne Johnson says:

      i dont like baseball so i didnt really like this book but it was ok i guess. it is about a baseball team going to the championship and winning it

    • Thomas Love says:

      Great idea, with no more than a couple pieces that were anything less than quite entertaining.

    • Sam Bauman says:

      There were a lot of fun essays in this book. I'd get excited every time one of my favorite authors was up or an essay about a Twin. Great summer reading.

    • Jermajesty says:

      Crack for baseball nerds. Beyond that, it's a terrific showcase for how sophisticated sportswriting has become these days. I loved this compilation.

    • Thomas Greaves says:

      A bit too Red Sox-centric, but overall very worthy of a read.

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